Historic Day in Bat Conservation

Friday April 17, 2015 was a historic day in global bat conservation!! Not only did we celebrate Bat Appreciation Day (mark your calendars…it’s always April 17), but there was another momentous event: the signing of a formal agreement between Canada, Mexico, and the United States to cooperate in efforts to protect bats and their habitats across the North American continent. This agreement provides a platform for continental conservation efforts, which will be particularly important for species like the Hoary Bat (Lasiurus cinereus), which knows no continental boundaries in North America. Cheers to all the hardworking bat biologists that made this possible!

You can find the text of the agreement here.

Hoary Bat (Lasiurus cinereus)

Hoary Bat (Lasiurus cinereus)

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Bat Technician Position Available – Great Smoky Mountains

Smokies 2014The Center for Bat Research, Outreach, and Conservation at Indiana State University is recruiting one (1) Field Technician to aid in a 19 week study of bats in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Research will involve mistnet surveys to capture bats, use of radio telemetry to track Indiana bats (Myotis sodalis) and northern long-eared bats (M. septentrionalis) to their day-roosts, measuring habitat characteristics around roosts, and deploying bat detectors to record bat calls in remote forested areas in Great Smoky Mountains National Park (on the border of Tennessee and North Carolina). The technician will work closely with a wildlife biologist to gain familiarity with the study area and survey techniques. On a daily basis, the technician will work with 1-4 other technicians to accomplish project objectives (capture, tracking, veg plots). Duties will also include driving (field vehicle will be provided, 4WD is necessary), hiking long distances in mountainous terrain (up to 10 miles/day), carrying heavy equipment, data entry, and data management. Housing will be provided (this will be in remote areas on the east and west sides of the Park), but over-night camping may occasionally be required.

This is an excellent opportunity to gain TONs of experience with bats and the techniques used to study bats. In addition, you’ll be working in one of the most beautiful parts of the country! For more information and to apply, please review this pdf:    Smokies Bat Technician

Smokies fieldwork 2014

 

 

 

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Field Technician Position (NE Tennessee)

Indiana State University is looking to hire a field technician to work on a bat presence study in the North Cherokee National Forest. The focus of this study is to compare the efficacy of acoustic data, GIS models, and traditional mist netting survey methods for predicting the presence of Indiana and Northern long-eared bats. The successful applicant will be working on a small crew with a graduate student to conduct acoustic surveys, radio telemetry, mist netting and emergence counts – with work being during both the day and night. Additional duties will include data entry, gear maintenance, decontamination following white-nose protocols, and various other tasks. The position will start mid-May and run to mid-August. The successful candidate will obtain experience in multiple bat survey methods while learning bat ID and gaining telemetry experience in mountainous terrain.

Candidates with rabies vaccines will have the opportunity to handle bats, but rabies vaccine/bat handling experience is not a requirement for this position.

Please see the following document for required qualifications, salary and how to apply:

CNF field tech 2015

Cherokee National Forest

To learn more about past and current projects conducted by ISU’s Bat Center, see our Research Page.

 

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Bat Field Technician Position (Indianapolis)

Indiana State University is seeking four field technicians to assist with research involving the federally endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis). This research will occur near the Indianapolis International Airport, and is part of a long-term monitoring effort. Duties will include mist-netting, radio telemetry, emergence counts, acoustic surveys, and conducting roost/habitat vegetation plots. 

Technicians are needed from May 14 to August 15 and can expect to work long shifts including late nights (up till 4 am) up to 10 nights in a row. A positive attitude and strong work ethic are the most important qualities we’re seeking.

This is a great opportunity for an undergraduate or recent graduate to gain experience with a variety of field techniques. The employee will gain hands-on experience using several different bat detector models, in addition to modern radio telemetry techniques.

Please see the following document for more information about the position and application process.

Bat Field Technician (Indianapolis) 2015

batfieldtech

To learn more about past and current projects conducted by ISU’s Bat Center, see our Research page.

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Model Describes How WNS Kills Bats

A new study by USGS and the University of Wisconsin describes the physiological process on how white-nose syndrome (WNS) is killing bats. Their results show a two fold increase in the fat energy use by bats infected with WNS when compared to uninfected bats. The difference between the two groups was apparent even in the early stages of the fungal infection.

The researchers propose a multi-stage disease progression model (shown below) to describe how WNS leads to mortality in hibernating bats. It is important to understand this devastating disease as we strive to find ways to reduce the spread of WNS and bat mortality.

White-nose Syndrom initiates a cascade of physiologic disturbances in the hibernating bat host - Verant et al.

White-nose Syndrom initiates a cascade of physiologic disturbances in the hibernating bat host – Verant et al.

The recently published article by Verant et al. is an Open Access article and can be found here.

PhysOrg also published an excellent summary of their research.

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USFWS Reopens Comment Period on Proposal to List Northern Long-eared Bat

Myotis septentrionalis

The US Fish and Wildlife Service has reopened the comment period on the proposal to list the northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionals) as endangered throughout its range. The northern long-eared bat is one of the species facing increased declines due to white-nose syndrome (WNS). The public comment period has been reopened until December 18, 2014 and a final decision on the proposal is due April 2, 2015.

Information on this proposal and more details on the northern long-eared bat can be found here. Comments can be submitted electronically or by hard copy. Please see the USFWS news release for submission instructions.

The USFWS is particularly interested in additional information and comments regarding the following:

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Bat Box Plans

Bat Box Plan

For more details on this plan, follow this link:

Bat Box Plan

How about a rocket style box? Click below for the plan:

Rocketbox_plan

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8th Annual Indiana Bat Festival Agenda – Saturday, September 13, 2014

2014_Bat_Fest_Agenda_Page_1 2014_Bat_Fest_Agenda_Page_22014_Bat_Fest_Agenda PDF version

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Join us for the 8th Annual Indiana Bat Festival – Bats in the City!!

Bats in the City!Click here for more information and directions!

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8th Annual Indiana Bat Festival Bookmark Contest

As part of our 8th Annual Indiana Bat Festival, we will have an art contest for school kids (K-12). This year, the folks at the Geography Educators Network of Indiana (http://www.iupui.edu/~geni/) have plans to create bookmarks from the prize winning entries, plus there will be prizes for students and teachers of winning entries. The theme of the art contest is “Bats in the City”. Entries are due by 29 August!!

Bat fest- bookmark contest

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